Fashionistacore

March 21, 2012

Chapter 2.5 is out, grab it while it’s hot and steamy as the date between these two characters!

http://menasepublications.blogspot.com/

or

http://www.baka-tsuki.org/project/index.php?title=The_Longing_Of_Shiina_Ryo:Volume2_Chapter_2.5:_Intermezzo:_The_Kouma_Yon_Experiment

 

PS: only two chapters left!

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11 Responses to “Fashionistacore”

  1. benaresu Says:

    My name is Kouma Yon and I do not, for a fact, believe in fate. <—– Someobe has been watching a bit of Mawaru Penguindrum lately

  2. benaresu Says:

    Well, just to drop by and mention it:
    This chapter was short, but brilliant. Probably my favorite so far. I don’t know what there is about a change of perspectives that makes it so refreshing and intriguing.
    I really didn’t go wrong by becoming a fan.

    I hope you don’t mind a more detailed analysis when all the chapters of the second novel are released.

    • thatguyfroma Says:

      Glad you enjoyed it!

      Thank you for your kind words. Personally, I liked Kouma’s chapter the best too until I was done with the last chapter of the novel because the latter is exactly what I’ve been wanting to write for a while. Can’t say much about it without ruining it completely but if you liked this one because of the tension, prepare to watch it escalate.

      Also yes, I intend to dissect the story as soon as it’s all published but the full psychological analysis of the characters will have to wait until volume 3 is done because, well, how they’re messed up is kind of a plot point… or the whole plot, if you think about it.

  3. xrdvx Says:

    Well. My first read was: It’s out it’s out it’s out … I’ll probably re-read and write my thoughts on it, with spoilers.
    It was rather nice to take a glimpse onto what Kouma was thinking. It also took me from loving shin-tsu to somehow disliking him (in a good way).
    It was, still, a nice read and I’m looking forward to the next on the story.
    As a final note, I like some of the ideas that dwell in her mind, specially the bit about arts and the feelings that are (or are not, according to her) infused into the work.

    • thatguyfroma Says:

      I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      Regarding your perception of Shin-tsu, consider Kouma’s small speech on biases. With a “paradigm shift” of that magnitude about love/hate polarizing, either you had a bias before due to only knowing his side and was freed from that by getting another perspective or you gained a new bias due to seeing something that may or may not be true. Maybe both, even. Now, I would not say Shin-tsu is a great guy because if I’m going to lie like that I might as well become a candidate in the next elections. Just don’t be too quick to trust Kouma, okay? First person narrative equals subjectivity, so take everything with a grain of salt until evidence proves it right.

      And to be honest, those are very similar to my personal views. Art and media really are about triggering emotions on others rather than expressing yours, although a mind talented (alternatively but not exclusively, well-trained) enough might be able to perform both as simultaneous actions. Which is unnecessary from the viewer standpoint, but might help the creator sleep better at night. Getting paid to shove your troubles down someone else’s throat? I call that “living the dream”.

  4. andrewbgross Says:

    (I mistakenly left this comment on the MeNaSePublications site before remembering that feedback goes here instead.)

    I liked this chapter a lot. I thought the use of “the boy I loved” was very effective– I actually re-read those two sentences when I was done reading the chapter. It conveys a certain amount of bittersweet wistfulness in just four words.

    Another thing I appreciated is that there weren’t as many overly-convoluted sentences. I get what you’re going for, and I get that it’s common for light novels (or at least the English translations of light novels I’ve read on baka-tsuki), but I find them an unnecessary distraction. The worst offender in this chapter is “More important than ends justifying means, my means justify following or avoiding on purpose whatever idea that acts as an initial spark to them.” That’s actually much less obtuse than many of the sentences in other chapters– which, again, I recognize as a personal preference.

    Finally, another thing that makes it hard for me to follow sometimes is this light novel convention of having an entire conversation without any “he said” or “I said” or “Shinzou said” or any markers to help you keep track of who’s talking. I get that it’s a convention of the genre, I just find it makes it unnecessarily frustrating for me to follow– it’s not uncommon for me to backtrack and read the same dialog again just to figure out who said what, which is a bit jarring. I had a go at re-editing “Gekkou” on baka-tsuki to try to make the speaker more clear via formatting, but it didn’t help much. (BTW, Gekkou is fantastic, well worth reading if you haven’t.)

    Keep up the good work!

    • thatguyfroma Says:

      Thank you for reading, I’m glad you enjoyed it. Kouma Yon’s point of view reads very different from Shin-tsu’s, especially in the sense she pays barely any attention to anything but the conversation and the implications of each sentence when they seem to have an underlying message. Readers (and Kouma) noticed Shin-tsu can go from an all-observing freak to an obsessive observer of a single character(istic) in a moment, but I don’t think many were expecting Kouma’s mindset to be even more uncommon, turning the world around her in a bunch of talking heads where action is something irrelevant at best when she’s interested in a topic. All she cares about is the case, as she views reality considerably more objectively than most: to her, that particular conversation was important and the place and individuals involved were in second plan. To a creature like her, process is absolute.

      That said, I wish I could blame it all on Kouma but it also comes from me being a very limited writer. I apologize.

      And yes, Gekkou is fantastic: the only flaw in it is that the author completely ignored the rest of the cast after the main character and main heroine’s resolution; fine, they are ok and presumably together, but what about everyone else? Are you done reediting? I will reread it once you are, although finding the time to do so might be hard due to my current day job and other responsibilities.

      • andrewbgross Says:

        One of the things that I deeply appreciate about Gekkou is that both of the protagonists are borderline psychopaths, yet still sympathetic protagonists. The degree of moral flexibility they display, their lack of empathy for other people, the fact that they only engage with other people to the degree that they find that person “interesting”– these are all traits that tend in the direction of psychopathic behavior. They’re not psycopaths, but they’re much further along in that direction than your average person, or your average protagonist.
        The reason I appreciate that so much is that it pretty much matches the way that I see the world– I’m most definitely not a psychopath, nor do I have Aspberger’s Syndrome; most people would describe me as being a relatively charismatic, socially well adjusted and successful person. But I’ve spent a lot of time and thought trying to understand why I seem to differ from everyone else on a number of dimensions– in pretty much the exact same ways that the protagonists in Gekkou do. They are probably the first two characters that I can remember reading in fiction that are both likeable and also have a very similar way of viewing the world as I do– it was actually a pretty powerful experience for me reading the book.

  5. andrewbgross Says:

    I liked this chapter a lot. I thought the use of “the boy I loved” was very effective– I actually re-read the two sentences that contained this phrase when I was done reading the chapter. It conveys a certain amount of bittersweet wistfulness in just four words.

    Another thing I appreciated is that there weren’t as many overly-convoluted sentences. I get what you’re going for, and I get that it’s common for light novels (or at least the English translations of light novels I’ve read on baka-tsuki), but I find them an unnecessary distraction. The worst offender in this chapter is “More important than ends justifying means, my means justify following or avoiding on purpose whatever idea that acts as an initial spark to them.” That’s actually much less obtuse than many of the sentences in other chapters– which, again, I recognize as a personal preference.

    Finally, another thing that makes it hard for me to follow sometimes is this light novel convention of having an entire conversation without any “he said” or “I said” or “Shinzou said” or any markers to help you keep track of who’s talking. I get that it’s a convention of the genre, I just find it makes it unnecessarily frustrating for me to follow– it’s not uncommon for me to backtrack and read the same dialog again just to figure out who said what, which is a bit jarring. I had a go at re-editing “Gekkou” on baka-tsuki to try to make the speaker more clear via formatting, but it didn’t help much. (BTW, Gekkou is fantastic, well worth reading if you haven’t.)

    Keep up the good work!


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